The Southern Frontier, vol. 1, no. 8

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Title

The Southern Frontier, vol. 1, no. 8

Description

Published by Commission on Interracial Cooperation (CIC), The Southern Frontier was a monthly newsletter, first issued in January, 1940. Aiming to share the stories overlooked by traditional newspapers, the newsletter published stories of social progress, as well as stories of racial injustices faced by African Americans across the American South.

As described by the then President of the CIC Howard W. Odum, the name The Southern Frontier alludes to the need for even greater pioneering and progress in the social and cultural frontiers, the American South being the most turbulent field in reference to race relations and progress at the time. 

Vol. 1, No. 8 contains contributions by: 

C. E. Chapman
Jonathan Daniels (editor of the Raleigh, N. C., News and Observer)
C. C. Spaulding

Selected articles are:

“The Need to Eat Is Not Racial” – An article discussing the increasingly impoverished conditions faced by not only the black community, but also the white community. It addresses how economic collapse and poor labor laws have resulted in lower-class jobs, perceived to be traditionally black jobs, being taken on by white people, and that the phenomenon it is not immediately a racial issue.

“Negroes Celebrate 75 Years of Progress” – An article about the American Negro Exposition held from July 4, 1940 to September 2, 1940 at Chicago Coliseum, an event commemorating the 75th anniversary of the emancipation of those held as slaves in the South as well as the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

A notice about Louisiana Senate Bill 100 describes a proposed law that would require that "only bona fide voters can be employed in any capacity by railroads operating within the State" (p. 2).

"White Women Seek Repeal of Poll Tax Law" notes that only eight states still assess a poll tax for the privilege of exercising the right of the franchise.

Death notices (outlined in mourning black) for Dr. James Hardy Dillard, Mrs. Hallie Paxson Winsborough, and John W. Abercrombie are found on p. 4.

Creator

Commission on Interracial Cooperation

Source

Jessie Daniel Ames Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching collection, 1930-1944, Austin Seminary Archives, Stitt Library, Austin Presbyterian Seminary Library

Date

1940 August

Contributor

Austin Seminary Archives, Stitt Library, Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary Library

Rights

The organization that has made the Item available believes that the Item is in the Public Domain under the laws of the United States, but a determination was not made as to its copyright status under the copyright laws of other countries. The Item may not be in the Public Domain under the laws of other countries. Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information. 
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/

Notes

Learn more: 
Pullen, Ann Ellis (2013). "Commission on Interracial Cooperation" New Georgia Encyclopedia.
Commission on Interracial Cooperation, Social Welfare History Image Portal 

Citation

Commission on Interracial Cooperation, “The Southern Frontier, vol. 1, no. 8,” Social Welfare History Image Portal, accessed December 19, 2018, https://images.socialwelfare.library.vcu.edu/items/show/359.